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Precision 3480, 3580 & 3581 Owner's Thread


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Kicking it off with my own machine. Not quite top spec, I need to bump up its available RAM and SSD, but good enough.

 

CPU says it can take up to 96GB of Memory, spec sheet says 64GB. I'm dying to stick two 64GB sticks in it, though.

 

Bought it to play with self-hosted Language Models, and because the CPU is a huge upgrade on my old Ryzen 7 4700U 8-core. 

 

From the get-go, I have problems with sleep mode, and the Windows 11 interface is sluggish when switching between desktops. I desperately miss Linux, but I'm worried about installing it onto this one, I'm running nVidia on my desktop Linux computer and it's not great, I'm terrified to get into the Optimus/Bumblebee nightmare again, so toughing out Windows for now.

 

For the curious, I've attached the CPU-Z report here.

 

Any others with this machine out there?

 

image.png.8c1537bcae73cd91f8fa20db3bfc0e75.pngimage.png.743d95d4b0278fc8b08c9f49b9c9e836.pngimage.png.72e25a771beaa571b9aae898ad16f446.png

 

Pic sources: Dell Precision 3480, 3580, and 3581 mobile workstations unveiled with 13th gen Intel Raptor Lake processors and up to RTX Ada Generation graphics

PRECISION.txt

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2 hours ago, sangemaru said:

From the get-go, I have problems with sleep mode, and the Windows 11 interface is sluggish when switching between desktops. I desperately miss Linux, but I'm worried about installing it onto this one, I'm running nVidia on my desktop Linux computer and it's not great, I'm terrified to get into the Optimus/Bumblebee nightmare again, so toughing out Windows for now.

 

I ran Linux for a few months on the Precision 7770 (Alder Lake 12950HX + NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Ti), with Optimus enabled, and no real issues running emulators or Windows games through Steam+Proton ... other than the dGPU sometimes not wanting to actually power off, or the CPU and dGPU fighting for power causing performance inconsistencies — both problems that I also had on Windows with that system.  I think that with Turing and later, NVIDIA support for graphics switching on Linux has improved a good bit.  So, try it out if you want, it might be just fine.

 

I don't think there are 64GB SODIMMs out yet, but there are 48GB, so you could probably install two to get 96GB in this thing if you wanted to.

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Apple MacBook Pro 16-inch, 2023 (personal) • Dell Precision 7560 (work) • Full specs in spoiler block below
Info posts (Dell) — Dell Precision key postsDell driver RSS feeds • Dell Fan Management — override fan behavior
Info posts (Windows) — Turbo boost toggle • The problem with Windows 11 • About Windows 10 LTSC

Spoiler

Apple MacBook Pro 16-inch, 2023 (personal)

  • M2 Max
    • 4 efficiency cores
    • 8 performance cores
    • 38-core Apple GPU
  • 96GB LPDDR5-6400
  • 8TB SSD
  • macOS 14 "Sonoma"
  • 16.2" 3456×2234 120 Hz mini-LED VRR display
  • Wi-Fi 6E + Bluetooth 5.3
  • 99.6Wh battery
  • 1080p webcam
  • Fingerprint reader

Also — iPhone 12 Pro 512GB, Apple Watch Series 8

 

Dell Precision 7560 (work)

  • Intel Xeon W-11955M ("Tiger Lake")
    • 8×2.6 GHz base, 5.0 GHz turbo, hyperthreading ("Willow Cove")
  • 64GB DDR4-3200 ECC
  • NVIDIA RTX A2000 4GB
  • Storage:
    • 512GB system drive (Micron 2300)
    • 4TB additional storage (Sabrent Rocket Q4)
  • Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2021
  • 15.6" 3940×2160 IPS display
  • Intel Wi-Fi AX210 (Wi-Fi 6E + Bluetooth 5.3)
  • 95Wh battery
  • 720p IR webcam
  • Fingerprint reader

 

Previous

  • Dell Precision 7530, 7510, M4800, M6700
  • Dell Latitude E6520
  • Dell Inspiron 1720, 5150
  • Dell Latitude CPi
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15 hours ago, Aaron44126 said:

I don't think there are 64GB SODIMMs out yet, but there are 48GB, so you could probably install two to get 96GB in this thing if you wanted to.

 

I hadn't realized there are 48GB sticks available, thanks for that heads-up. I see they're a bit pricy but Lord, it's super tempting.

 

15 hours ago, Aaron44126 said:

So, try it out if you want, it might be just fine.

 

 

Thanks for the vote of confidence. I guess I'll bite the bullet.

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  • 2 weeks later...

So I had been feeling a bit unsatisfied with the thermals on my machine. Not only would I run into a Power throttle around 35W (as reported by ThrottleStop), but I noticed I was getting thermals up into the 90s as well. I went ahead and opened it up to take some pictures and replace the paste with some HeatSpring Indium-Gallium thermal interface.

 

Had a lot of cleaning and polishing to do on the heatsink sections for the GPU and CPU. This is the GPU side.

20240208_012631 (2).jpg

 

Putting in that indium-gallium.

20240208_012309 (2).jpg

 

The beast in all its glory.

20240208_005957 (2).jpg

 

Intel CPU on the left, nVidia GPU on the right. Notice how massive the i7-13800H chip is.

20240208_010142 (2).jpg

 

I had to do a lot of polishing to clean the gunk off. Also caused some scratches.

20240208_012637 (2).jpg

 

As you can see, Dell went about liberally applying thermal paste. Lots of run-off. Blue shroud fills in for missing battery. Would have been interesting to fit a 2.5" SATA HDD in there, but there are ribbons and other components underneath and no connector that I could see for SATA.

20240208_005121 (2).jpg

 

I got a surprise in that I wasn't expecting my machine to have a WWAN modem. Can't wait to use it.

20240208_010123 (2).jpg

 

Unfortunately, the heatsink pressure is really poor, in fact I had to double-layer the HeatSpring TIM to get contact, using a single layer resulted in barely any contact. See the flattened section there. That's what all of it was supposed to look like.

20240208_012128 (2).jpg

 

Wireless card.

20240208_010021 (2).jpg

 

Tiny 512GB SSD. Literally tiny. Can't wait to upgrade it. I have an ADATA XPG SX8200 2TB waiting to arrive.

20240208_010034 (2).jpg

 

This is the dedicated heat spreader for the secondary SSD. Frankly, quite impressive.

20240208_013535 (2).jpg

 

The backplate. Every single screw has a retaining clip. Love it.

20240208_005129 (2).jpg

 

This is the small battery option. The blue shroud to the left covers empty space. If this battery ever gets low, I plan to upgrade with the bigger 90+Wh version.

20240208_010102 (2).jpg

 

The nVidia RTX2000 Ada Generation (Mobile). Basically an RTX4050 Quadro.

20240208_010046 (2).jpg

 

Notice the literal dumping of thermal paste from the factory. Heatsink is easy to remove, and carries retaining clips for the 7 heatsink screws, but NOT for the two fan screws.

20240208_005113 (2).jpg

20240208_010145 (2).jpg

20240208_012146_001 (2).jpg

Edited by sangemaru
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Oh btw. The key to power on this machine is clearly controlling thermals. MMIO 'lock' brings up the MMIO PL1 from the 32-37 range which seemed to correspond to a cap on available power based on temperatures, all the way up to 82, which seems to be the max power. Basically if you can keep the CPU cool, you can keep drawing PL1 max as much as you like.

TS max power.jpeg

TS MMIO lock.jpeg

TS package power.jpeg

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