Jump to content
NotebookTalk

Modular laptop - Framework


Eban

Recommended Posts

This is a little older tech but hey I never knew about it so maybe someone else would like to know.

As a laptop I'm not sold on it. I like the idea but it seems a bit too.....yuppy (is that still a word? sorry I'm old)

 

 

https://frame.work/

 

 

 

 

 

Thunderchild // Lenovo Legion Y740 17" i7-9750H rtx2080maxQ win10 

RainBird // Alienware 17 (Ranger) i7-4910mq gtx860m win10LTSC

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Framework released motherboards that have Intel's 12th-gen processors on them so the tech is hardly "older."

Desktop: Ryzen 5 5600X3D | 32 GB RAM | GeForce RTX 3080 | 4 TB SSD | Windows 11

Gigabyte Aorus 16X: Core i7-14650HX | 32 GB RAM | GeForce RTX 4070 | 1 TB SSD | Windows 11

Lenovo IdeaPad 3 Gaming: Ryzen 7 6800H | 16 GB RAM | GeForce RTX 3050 | 512 GB SSD | Windows 11

Lenovo IdeaPad 5 Pro: Ryzen 5 5600U | 16 GB RAM | Radeon Graphics | 512 GB SSD | Windows 11

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, saturnotaku said:

Framework released motherboards that have Intel's 12th-gen processors on them so the tech is hardly "older."

 Split hairs....you know what I mean. 

They been around since 2020 and I only just heard about them. So no not ooooold...just not latest 6 months as in "tech news".

  • Haha 1

Thunderchild // Lenovo Legion Y740 17" i7-9750H rtx2080maxQ win10 

RainBird // Alienware 17 (Ranger) i7-4910mq gtx860m win10LTSC

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 5 months later...

AMD chips for the framework and also a gpu module.

 

 

  • Thumb Up 2

7950X3D| Zotac 4090 AMP Extreme Airo| MSI MPG B650 Edge Wifi| Lian Li Galahad 360 V2| 32GB Kingston Renegade RGBZ 6000|Kingston KC3000 2TB| Fury Renegade 2TB|Samsung 970 Evo 1TB| Lian Li O11 Dynamic Evo| Corsair HX1500i| Samsung Odyssey G9 Neo

Asus Zephyrus G15 (Ryzen 9 6900HS + RTX3080)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll believe what I'm seeing when they actually have more than one generation of support for the upgradable GPU modules.

  • Thumb Up 3
  • Bump 3

Desktop: Ryzen 5 5600X3D | 32 GB RAM | GeForce RTX 3080 | 4 TB SSD | Windows 11

Gigabyte Aorus 16X: Core i7-14650HX | 32 GB RAM | GeForce RTX 4070 | 1 TB SSD | Windows 11

Lenovo IdeaPad 3 Gaming: Ryzen 7 6800H | 16 GB RAM | GeForce RTX 3050 | 512 GB SSD | Windows 11

Lenovo IdeaPad 5 Pro: Ryzen 5 5600U | 16 GB RAM | Radeon Graphics | 512 GB SSD | Windows 11

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What saturnotaku said - and also, not just the GPU itself, but also the heatsink needs to be easily swappable.

 

I have an older laptop with an MXM 3.0b module.  Great, so it's upgradeable!  Well, from a GPU standpoint, yes, it is.  From a heatsink standpoint, it's not so straightforward.  It meant grinding down heatsinks to fit new GPUs and different VRM layouts, or conversely adding new materials so it maintains contact when the GPU or VRMs aren't as tall.  If a straight GPU swap was something 20% of people might try with supporting documentation, the GPU swap + manual adjustments to the heatsink takes it down to 2%.

 

I'm sure Framework is aware that they need to have the heatsink aspect also be plug-and-play to really deliver on the promise, but the proof is in the pudding as they say.

 

Now if they can deliver that, and the specs are compelling (which based on the 13 I'm cautiously optimistic they will be), this looks really cool.  The 16 would be essentially what I wanted to buy last fall in that case.  I'm also really happy to see the 16 will have 6 expansion cards instead of 4.  That'll make it a lot easier to use as a DTR.

Desktop: Core i5 2500k "Sandy Bridge" | RX 480 | 32 GB DDR3 | 1 TB 850 Evo + 512 GB NVME + HDDs | Seasonic 650W | Noctua Fans | 8.1 Pro

Laptop: MSI Alpha 15 | Ryzen 5800H | Radeon 6600M | 64 GB DDR4 | 4 TB TLC SSD | 10 Home

Laptop history: MSI GL63 (2018) | HP EliteBook 8740w (acq. 2014) | Dell Inspiron 1520 (2007)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MXM was pretty standard up to 980M. I upgraded a M15x recently (260M gen) and the 980M was basically plug n play heatsink wise. 

 

Quadro's were also pretty standard (up to P5000). If you got lucky like me and found a official nVidia partner Quadro MXM like my RTX 3000, it was also standard and needed no mods. 

 

I saw the framework needed a new motherboard to go from 12th-gen to 13th-gen. To me this is not properly "upgradable" you are literally having to replace the whole motherboard. I could replace CPUs in my older laptops. 

 

It's a nice concept but unless the whole industry accepts it and mobile CPUs go PGA again, this ain't going anywhere far. 

Alienware m18             : Intel Core i9 13900HX                  | nVidia GeForce RTX 4090    | K1675 | 2x1TB SSDs 

Alienware Area-51M : Intel Core i9-9900K @ 5.3Ghz    | nVidia GeForce RTX 2080    | AX210 | Samsung 970 Evo+ 
Alienware M18x R2 :    Intel Core i7 3920XM @ 4.7Ghz | nVidia Quadro RTX 3000     | AX210 | Samsung 980 PRO   
Clevo X170SM-G:         Intel Core i7 10700K @ Stock     | nVidia GeForce RTX 2070S | AX210 | 256GB+2x512GB 

More Laps: M14x (555m) | M14xR2 (650m) | M15x (980m) | M17xR3 (880m) | M18xR1 (880m SLI) | 18 R1 (RTX 3000)

DT: Aurora R4 (i9 10980XE/RTX 4070) | Area-51 R2 (22-Core Xeon/2x Titan V) | SR-2 [2x6-Core/3x980Ti] | Mac Studio


CS Studios YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/CSStudiosYT 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, Sandy Bridge said:

I'm sure Framework is aware that they need to have the heatsink aspect also be plug-and-play to really deliver on the promise, but the proof is in the pudding as they say.


This has been addressed directly. The heatsink is in the expansion bay with the dGPU. You don't detach the heatsink separately from the GPU card; they swap in and out together as one unit (in a way, similar to desktop GPUs). This allows for a different size heatsink depending on the dGPU, and you don’t even have to repaste anything when swapping the dGPU.

  • Thumb Up 2

Apple MacBook Pro 16-inch, 2023 (personal) • Dell Precision 7560 (work) • Full specs in spoiler block below
Info posts (Dell) — Dell Precision key postsDell driver RSS feeds • Dell Fan Management — override fan behavior
Info posts (Windows) — Turbo boost toggle • The problem with Windows 11 • About Windows 10 LTSC

Spoiler

Apple MacBook Pro 16-inch, 2023 (personal)

  • M2 Max
    • 4 efficiency cores
    • 8 performance cores
    • 38-core Apple GPU
  • 96GB LPDDR5-6400
  • 8TB SSD
  • macOS 14 "Sonoma"
  • 16.2" 3456×2234 120 Hz mini-LED VRR display
  • Wi-Fi 6E + Bluetooth 5.3
  • 99.6Wh battery
  • 1080p webcam
  • Fingerprint reader

Also — iPhone 12 Pro 512GB, Apple Watch Series 8

 

Dell Precision 7560 (work)

  • Intel Xeon W-11955M ("Tiger Lake")
    • 8×2.6 GHz base, 5.0 GHz turbo, hyperthreading ("Willow Cove")
  • 64GB DDR4-3200 ECC
  • NVIDIA RTX A2000 4GB
  • Storage:
    • 512GB system drive (Micron 2300)
    • 4TB additional storage (Sabrent Rocket Q4)
  • Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2021
  • 15.6" 3940×2160 IPS display
  • Intel Wi-Fi AX210 (Wi-Fi 6E + Bluetooth 5.3)
  • 95Wh battery
  • 720p IR webcam
  • Fingerprint reader

 

Previous

  • Dell Precision 7770, 7530, 7510, M4800, M6700
  • Dell Latitude E6520
  • Dell Inspiron 1720, 5150
  • Dell Latitude CPi
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/2/2023 at 7:53 AM, Aaron44126 said:


This has been addressed directly. The heatsink is in the expansion bay with the dGPU. You don't detach the heatsink separately from the GPU card; they swap in and out together as one unit (in a way, similar to desktop GPUs). This allows for a different size heatsink depending on the dGPU, and you don’t even have to repaste anything when swapping the dGPU.

Oh, that is good news.  I didn't find it earlier when looking at their website, but their GitHub seems to describe it at https://github.com/FrameworkComputer/ExpansionBay - it looks like the Expansion Bay includes GPU, heatsink, and fans (which answers the question of how is the heatsink connected to the fan).

 

That is nice as it really would be plug-and-play.  Like eGPU but integrated into the laptop.

 

It's also good to know that Quadros were pretty consistent with MXM.  I had an ATi FirePro card and going from FirePro to Quadro would not have been straightforward heatsink-wise, at least on my HP.  No idea whether FirePros are heatsink-compatible, maybe they are but HP's BIOS whitelisting shenanigans meant upgrading to a newer FirePro wasn't feasible.  Shouldn't have to worry about that with these Expansion Bays.

 

I would be happy to see socketed mobile CPUs again, but in the short term the "whole mobo" approach is the only viable one, unless it's using a desktop class CPU.  I would be interested in "Framework 18" with a 65W AM5 CPU, but they probably are making the correct progression for the market by going for a 16-inch dGPU option first.

 

Any reports on which CPUs the Framework 16 will be using?  I see they've added an AMD option on the smaller one but haven't found info on the 16.  I still favor AMD for power-efficiency reasons, even though I know Intel isn't as far behind on that front as they used to be.

Desktop: Core i5 2500k "Sandy Bridge" | RX 480 | 32 GB DDR3 | 1 TB 850 Evo + 512 GB NVME + HDDs | Seasonic 650W | Noctua Fans | 8.1 Pro

Laptop: MSI Alpha 15 | Ryzen 5800H | Radeon 6600M | 64 GB DDR4 | 4 TB TLC SSD | 10 Home

Laptop history: MSI GL63 (2018) | HP EliteBook 8740w (acq. 2014) | Dell Inspiron 1520 (2007)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They haven’t announced any specs for Framework Laptop 16 yet, but are promising a full reveal later in the spring.

  • Thumb Up 1

Apple MacBook Pro 16-inch, 2023 (personal) • Dell Precision 7560 (work) • Full specs in spoiler block below
Info posts (Dell) — Dell Precision key postsDell driver RSS feeds • Dell Fan Management — override fan behavior
Info posts (Windows) — Turbo boost toggle • The problem with Windows 11 • About Windows 10 LTSC

Spoiler

Apple MacBook Pro 16-inch, 2023 (personal)

  • M2 Max
    • 4 efficiency cores
    • 8 performance cores
    • 38-core Apple GPU
  • 96GB LPDDR5-6400
  • 8TB SSD
  • macOS 14 "Sonoma"
  • 16.2" 3456×2234 120 Hz mini-LED VRR display
  • Wi-Fi 6E + Bluetooth 5.3
  • 99.6Wh battery
  • 1080p webcam
  • Fingerprint reader

Also — iPhone 12 Pro 512GB, Apple Watch Series 8

 

Dell Precision 7560 (work)

  • Intel Xeon W-11955M ("Tiger Lake")
    • 8×2.6 GHz base, 5.0 GHz turbo, hyperthreading ("Willow Cove")
  • 64GB DDR4-3200 ECC
  • NVIDIA RTX A2000 4GB
  • Storage:
    • 512GB system drive (Micron 2300)
    • 4TB additional storage (Sabrent Rocket Q4)
  • Windows 10 Enterprise LTSC 2021
  • 15.6" 3940×2160 IPS display
  • Intel Wi-Fi AX210 (Wi-Fi 6E + Bluetooth 5.3)
  • 95Wh battery
  • 720p IR webcam
  • Fingerprint reader

 

Previous

  • Dell Precision 7770, 7530, 7510, M4800, M6700
  • Dell Latitude E6520
  • Dell Inspiron 1720, 5150
  • Dell Latitude CPi
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Terms of Use